Exercise

Exercise
Exercise is the top resource to help keep you moving with less inflammation and joint pain. Ignoring the pain won’t make it go away. Nor will avoiding all motions that spark discomfort. In fact, limiting your movements can weaken muscles, compounding joint trouble, and affect your posture, setting off a cascade of further problems. And while pain relievers and cold or hot packs may offer quick relief, fixes like these are merely temporary.

By contrast, the right set of exercises can be a long-lasting way to minimize ankle, knee, hip, or shoulder pain. Practiced regularly, joint pain relief workouts might permit you to postpone — or even avoid — surgery on a problem joint that has been worsening for years by strengthening key supportive muscles and restoring flexibility.

Exercise is more than doing sit-ups. Actually, exercise and activity is made up of daily tasks, both occupational and leisure activities. Individuals with arthritis who exercise regularly have less pain, more energy, improved sleep and better day-to-day function. Over time, you may find limitations you’ve learned to work around will begin to ease. Beyond the benefits to your joints, becoming more active can help you stay independent long into your later years.

Starting off slowly with a few, low-intensity exercises will help to ensure a safe and successful exercise program. Having several exercise options and locations keeps you from becoming bored and provides alternatives on those days when getting out of the house seems impossible. American College of Rheumatology guidelines suggest that exercise should be one of the mainstays of treatment for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee.